MISSIONAL MOMS | PART ONE

What does it look like to be fully engaged in motherhood and mission at the same time? Hannah Morr shares how she has learned to live on mission as a mom through prayer, daily reminding herself of the gospel, orienting her heart towards mission, being a friend of sinners like Jesus, and pursuing those who don’t know Him. She also shares some practical advice concerning joining what’s already going on in your city, recognizing changing capacity, and prioritizing time with those who don’t know Jesus.

MISSIONAL MOMS | PART TWO

How can moms faithfully engage on mission in the midst of the time consuming responsibilities of parenting? Sondra Chamberlain shares how she has learned to see everyday opportunities to point people to Jesus through tasks like running errands, interacting with other moms, and being involved at her children’s school. Additionally, she speaks to the importance of depending on Jesus, being open and honest in community, and having a community of moms together on mission.

MISSIONAL COMMUNITY LOGISTICS

How can a missional community manage logistics effectively in the midst of busy schedules and numerous kids? Hannah Morr shares some practical ideas about host homes, meals, meeting locations, content time, and caring for kids. Trough spreading around responsibilities and continually being flexible, missional communities can be life giving in the midst of the busyness of life.

WHAT IS MISSIONAL ACTIVITY?

How do we define “missional” activity? Todd Morr shares the importance of defining our mission as making disciples, as we seek to develop relationships to a point where we are proclaiming Jesus. Specifically, in the context of true friendship, we need to listen to people’s stories, share our own story, build spiritual bridges, and proclaim Jesus through the empowerment and leading of the Holy Spirit.

LIVING WITH INTENTIONALITY

How is it possible to live life on mission in the midst of a busy schedule? Jayne Vanderstelt speaks to the reality that mission is not something that we add on to what we are already doing in our compartmentalized lives. Rather, mission happens when we respond to the leading of the Holy Spirit, intentionally loving and serving those whom God puts in our path as we live lives that are visible and consistent.

PROXIMITY VS. AFFINITY

What are proximity and affinity, and how do they help to bring focus to missional communities? Randy Sheets defines proximity as making disciples of those who live around you, and affinity as making disciples of those with whom you share a common interest. Trough assessing missional context and being aware of opportunities that the Holy Spirit brings, we can discern how and when to use these approaches to mission.

WORK & MISSION

How do we navigate the tension between being faithful to our jobs and to our missional communities? Coby Strausbaugh shares what he’s learned as a small business owner and missional community leader, bringing focus to the reality that God deeply cares about our work. Practical advice is given on how we can see business as a means to something far greater than simply making ends meet.

VALUING PERSONALITY AND GIFTING

How can we call people to live out who God has uniquely made them to be in the midst of missional community life? David Achata shares how understanding the threefold framework of common identity, vocational lens, and spiritual gifts are helpful in empowering people to serve in a way that utilizes their strengths both practically and spiritually. Additionally, insight is provided into how personality assessments like Myers-Briggs can be helpful to this end.

MANAGING THE SEASONS OF A MISSIONAL COMMUNITY

In the midst of the changing seasons of life, how can we be faithful to make disciples through missional communities? Todd Morr shares some creative and practical ways to care for people well in varying seasons, avoiding a one size fts all mentality. Through being sensitive to Spirit and adjusting weekly rhythms when needed, missional communities can maintain consistency and focus throughout changing seasons.

SUBURBAN MISSIONAL COMMUNITIES | PART 1

Can missional communities work in a suburban, upper-middle class context? Mark Tilden shares that they absolutely can because people respond to the gospel and to love in every context. His missional community has sought to sacrificially love their neighbors as they live ordinary life with gospel intentionality, engaging in the rhythms of their suburb as a missional community.

SUBURBAN MISSIONAL COMMUNITIES | PART 2

Given the pressures on people in the suburbs for their time, talent, and resources, how can a missional community work in this context? Jeff and Karen Wall share how their missional community has sought to reach their suburb through leading with Jesus, cultivating endurance in relationships, building community in weakness, and being diligent in prayer. Despite challenges along the way, their missional community has seen many reached with the gospel in ways that are unique to a missional community model.

ETHNICALLY DIVERSE NEIGBORHOODS

What does it look like for a missional community to make disciples in an ethnically diverse neighborhood? John Prince shares how his missional community has been able to build cross-cultural relationships as they have seen the gospel transcend cultural barriers. Creative ideas for community engagement are provided as well as important lessons that have been learned along the way.

USING A MISSIONAL COMMUNITY COVENANT

What is a missional community covenant, and how can it be used to bring clarity and ownership to mission? Randy Sheets shares that a missional community covenant entails agreeing around the gospel, the definition of a disciple, the mission of the group, and individual roles in the mission. Through engaging in the covenanting process seasonally, missional community covenants can help missional communities to recalibrate and maintain their missional focus.

PROACTIVE AND REACTIVE MISSION

What is the balance between the proactive and reactive side of mission? Coby Strausbaugh shares that proactive mission involves unifying as a missional community around making disciples of a particular group of people, while reactive mission involves responding to the opportunities that God brings up in everyday life. Since God is intensely interested in both, missional communities need to balance proactive and reactive mission in a way that empowers people to engage on mission corporately and individually.

OLDER GENERATION ON MISSION

What does it look like for the older generation to live on mission? Don and Bunny Crook share stories from their experience leading a missional community as they have proactively sought to bless their neighbors and share Jesus with them. They provide encouragement that it really works for the older generation to live as missionaries in their later years.

 

SINGLES IN MISSIONAL COMMUNITY LIFE

What does it look like for singles to meaningfully engage in missional community life? Emily Kerry shares how she has lived life alongside families in her missional community, serving them and being served by them in the process. Through engaging in the rhythms of life with families, she has sought to faithfully use her season of singleness for God’s glory.